July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAdams County Sheriff’s Deputies have arrested the man believed responsible for shooting a 22 year old man near Othello on Saturday.Juan Omar Gonzalez was arrested this morning, charged in the shooting of Cristobal DeJesus-Camacho.  Sheriff Dale Wagner reported DeJesus-Camacho was in stable condition as of Saturday evening.Deputies served a search warrant Tuesday at a residence in the 600 block of South Saddle Road, near the scene of the shooting and detained several people for questioning.  This morning, the Sheriff’s Department announced the arrests of four individuals on outstanding warrants and the seizure of several firearms that may have been related to Saturday’s shooting.  Our news partner iFiber One News reported the four arrested were Osbaldo Israel Saucedo, 28, Hector Carrillo Gonzalez, 51, Ashley Dawn Younger, 32, and Comaletta Evelyn Monroe, 39.last_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgby, Dr. Bill ThomasTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesOne of the points I always like to make to people when I am talking about prescription drugs is that everyone involved needs to keep the “Goldilocks Principle” in mind…The right number of medicines is “not too much, not too little, but just right.”Over the years I have rampaged around New Hampshire with AARP’s Jamie Bulen helping her with her “Wise Use of Medications” campaign.Man have we had fun.Here is a shot of Jamie and I getting ready to throw it down.Related PostsMore Wise Use PleaseLast week I wrote about two  fallacies: 1) “More Treatment Is Always Better Than Less Treatment.” 2)”Drugs Always Do More Good Than Harm” Both of these statements are false. The widespread belief that they are true is responsible for tens of thousands of deaths a year along with the terrible,…AARP Is No Friend To Big PharmaWhen it comes to the chronic over-medicating of older adults, AARP has been a consistent critic of Big Pharma and the doctors who overprescribe dangerous cocktails of drugs without fully understanding their impact on older adults. And considering the size of this epidemic, it’s a darn good thing AARP is…The Over-Medication of Us, the ElderlyOver the past months,  several themes keep recurring on my blog. One repeated topic is the key way that diet and exercise affect our health and well-being. Another – and the focus of today’s post – is the potential harm that often results f…TweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: medication Pharmalast_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgSports Illustrated is ranking the top 100 players in college football. Here are numbers 11-25 (LINK), #26-50 (LINK), and #51-100 (LINK). Full Trailer for Season 4 of Last Chance UJuly 19thpic.twitter.com/0Ngo8BSWS2— Last Chance U (@LastChanceUAlum) July 9, 2019  1 0You need to login in order to vote Hit the jump for more. Shea Patterson (image via PFF)center_img To develop elite hand quickness and reaction your got keep practicing your pass rush moves… even on innocent bystanders! More tips like these on Proplay. Apple store linkhttps://t.co/if53SUjmnMGoogle play link https://t.co/I0zeQn49Tk pic.twitter.com/VfB9THuEyi— Craig Roh (@craigroh) July 10, 2019 Tags: morning rounduplast_img read more

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Why don’t an octopus’s arms become hopelessly entangled? Their appendages can move with seemingly infinite freedom, forming far more postures and positions than their brains could possibly keep tabs on. The key, according to a study published online today in Current Biology, is chemicals in their skin. By examining amputated octopus arms (don’t worry, they grow back) of the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris, shown), researchers have found that the creature’s suckers don’t latch on to its own arms the way they snare everything else. Petri dishes coated with intact octopus skin became “immune” to the zombie arms. The same occurred if the skin was ground up into a mush and spread over the petri dish, implying that a special substance in the skin is responsible for repelling the suckers. That’s important because octopuses have been known to dine on their comrades. So somehow a chemical in their skin not only keeps them from tangling themselves up, but it also prevents them from eating themselves alive. read more

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first_imgThe researchers, led by Christopher Kuzawa, an anthropologist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, found that when the brain demands lots of energy, body growth slows. For example, the period of highest brain glucose uptake—between 4.5 and 5 years of age—coincides with the period of lowest weight gain. This strongly suggested that the brain’s high energy needs during childhood are compensated for by slower growth.“This is a very, very cool paper,” says Karin Isler, a biological anthropologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. “It very convincingly shows that the conflicting demands of the brain’s and the body’s energy requirements for growth are met, in humans, by a temporal sequence of delayed growth.”The expensive tissue hypothesis was first proposed in 1995 by anthropologists Leslie Aiello of New York’s Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research and Peter Wheeler of the United Kingdom’s Liverpool John Moores University. Although it was initially thought that bigger brains were supported by smaller digestive systems, later studies revealed that other mechanisms could also be at work. Isler and primatologist Carel Van Schaik from the University of Zurich suggested that energy-rich diets, delayed growth and reproduction, and energy-efficient locomotion could also help feed the energy-hungry brain. Humans show signs of all three: We cook our food and eat meat, boosting caloric intake; we grow up more slowly and reproduce later; and we walk on two feet, saving energy compared with quadrupedal chimpanzees. The PNAS study supports the trade-off between delayed growth and larger brains, Isler says.The ideal next step would be to see if a similar trade-off with growth happens in other primates, too. But that will hard, Kuzawa says. “Obtaining PET data on brain glucose use across the full growing years in other closely related primates would be fascinating but difficult, and likely impossible for the more relevant comparative species like chimpanzees,” he says.*Correction, 26 August, 11:56 a.m.: An earlier version of the story incorrectly stated that the study sample sizes were 400 and 1000, although they were higher. The article has been amended to reflect this. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Humans are late bloomers when compared with other primates—they spend almost twice as long in childhood and adolescence as chimps, gibbons, or macaques do. But why? One widely accepted but hard-to-test theory is that children’s brains consume so much energy that they divert glucose from the rest of the body, slowing growth. Now, a clever study of glucose uptake and body growth in children confirms this “expensive tissue” hypothesis.Previous studies have shown that our brains guzzle between 44% and 87% of the total energy consumed by our resting bodies during infancy and childhood. Could that be why we take so long to grow up? One way to find out is with more precise studies of brain metabolism throughout childhood, but those studies don’t exist yet. However, a new study published online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) spliced together three older data sets to provide a test of this hypothesis.First, the researchers used a 1987 study of PET scans of 36 people between infancy and 30 years of age to estimate age trends in glucose uptake by three major sections of the brain. Then, to calculate how uptake varied for the entire brain, they combined that data with the brain volumes and ages of more than 400 individuals between 4.5 years of age and adulthood, gathered from a National Institutes of Health study and others. Finally, to link age and brain glucose uptake to body size, they used an age series of brain and body weights of more than 1000 individuals from birth to adulthood, gathered in 1978.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img Email The slowdown in the West African Ebola epidemic is welcome news and reason to be hopeful—but it’s also creating a new problem. With fewer new cases occurring, it is becoming more and more difficult to test vaccines and drugs. As a result, conflicts are looming over who can test Ebola drugs and vaccines in Guinea and Sierra Leone.In Guinea, a large consortium that includes Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) vaccinated the first volunteers at risk of Ebola on Monday in a big trial of a vaccine produced by Merck and NewLink Genetics. But the team feels threatened because researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) are looking to move another vaccine study from Liberia, where the epidemic has come to a virtual standstill, to Guinea.The U.S. move could jeopardize the Guinean trial, says John-Arne Røttingen of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, who chairs the study’s steering committee. “Can the two trials be going on in the same place? I don’t think so,” says Marie-Paule Kieny, an assistant director-general at WHO. “There is a risk, if this is not done in an orderly way, that neither trial is conclusive in the end.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country But Clifford Lane, head of clinical research at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, which is part of NIH, says that Guinea, which reported 45 new patients last week, can accommodate both studies. “Guinea is basically as large as Sierra Leone and Liberia together,” he says. “It would seem reasonable to at least explore the possibility.”Meanwhile, an international team testing an Ebola drug called TKM-Ebola in Sierra Leone is worried that NIH is seeking to expand its trial of ZMapp, another Ebola therapy, from Liberia to Sierra Leone. That move could prevent the researchers from expanding their TKM-Ebola trial as planned, or even create direct competition at an Ebola treatment unit in the Sierra Leonean town of Port Loko where it is already under way.Before the current outbreak, scientists never had a real chance to test Ebola drugs or vaccines for efficacy. The products hadn’t moved through phase I safety studies, and the outbreaks were much smaller and always ended within a few months. The current epidemic, which has caused almost 25,000 cases and more than 10,000 deaths, offers a unique opportunity to test candidate vaccines and drugs that could save lives in the future, scientists say.Ironically, Guinea was initially passed over when vaccine trials were planned. Last October, when some models suggested more than a million people might get Ebola, scientists, politicians, and regulators met in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss how to push ahead with candidate vaccines. At the end of that meeting, plans had been agreed to study vaccines in Sierra Leone and Liberia; Guinea, where the outbreak had started but which had fewer patients, was seen as a particularly difficult environment for testing a vaccine. Feeling that was unfair, some meeting participants formed a working group to design a trial for Guinea and make sure that at least some Guineans would have early access to the experimental vaccines.The group came up with an unusual design called a “ring vaccination trial,” in which a ring of people around a newly discovered Ebola patient is vaccinated. Entire rings are randomized to be vaccinated either immediately or after 21 days. If significantly more people contract Ebola in the latter rings, the vaccine is deemed effective.The NIH study, on the other hand, is designed as a classic randomized controlled trial (RCT), with one group receiving the Merck–NewLink Genetics vaccine candidate, another group a different vaccine developed by GlaxoSmithKline, and a third group receiving a placebo. The researchers started vaccinating healthy adults in Liberia in early February, initially to study how safe the vaccines are and how much of an immune response they generate. “We think we will have a very good safety and immunogenicity database,” Lane says.After several hundred vaccinations, the scientists are ready to start phase III, in which efficacy is tested. But that won’t be possible in Liberia, where only one patient has been confirmed in the past 3 weeks, Lane says. “We are committed to trying to complete the study. To do that we are probably going to have to work in Guinea and/or Sierra Leone,” he says. The team has reached out to the Guinean ministry of health and to French researchers working on a drug trial in Guinea, “to see if something can be put together,” Lane adds. “I would hope that a country like Guinea is big enough to do at least two studies.”No, it’s not, says Peter Smith, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine who was asked by WHO to study the issue. (Smith is not directly involved with the ring vaccination trial, but he chairs the board of the Norwegian Global Health and Vaccination Research program, which is co-funding it.)  “My conclusion is that it would not be feasible to successfully run both trials in Guinea at the same time (unless there is a radical change in the epidemiology of the disease in Guinea and disease incidence rates increase to levels very much higher than they are now),” he writes in an e-mail to ScienceInsider.Allocating one part of the country for the NIH study and excluding cases in that area from the ring vaccination trial would not work, Smith says, because the likelihood of catching Ebola is only big enough in the area around Conakry, the capital, where the WHO-MSF study has already started. “It would not only jeopardize the chances of the ring vaccination trial having sufficient power to show efficacy but also, unless NIH was prepared to increase the size of their trial very substantially, the NIH trial would have little or no power to detect efficacy.”Whether Guinea will agree to host the NIH trial as well is unclear, but there is clearly a need for the two groups to talk, Røttingen says. “I hope we can sit down and have a good discussion with them; we haven’t been able to do that at this stage.” A compromise could be to run the two trials one after the other, Kieny says. The ring vaccination trial is scheduled to enroll 190 rings by late May; the last vaccinations would take place 3 weeks after that. Add a few months of follow-up, Kieny says, and then NIH could start its own study. “Frankly, they are not ready to start now anyway.”Lane says it would likely take 6 to 8 weeks to start the new trial in Guinea. The study should not be delayed further, he argues, partly because the design of the WHO-MSF study may not be the best for assessing how effective a vaccine is. For instance, he says, most of the prevented cases in the ring vaccination trial would occur shortly after exposure, leaving it open to how well the vaccine protects in the longer term. “If my goal is to get the most effective vaccine as quickly as possible to the largest number of people possible, I do think an RCT is the most direct way,” he says.In Sierra Leone, researchers from the University of Oxford recently started a trial of TKM-Ebola, an experimental Ebola therapeutic made of synthetic, small, interfering RNAs. Now, the NIH-led effort to test the antibody cocktail ZMapp is expanding from Liberia to Sierra Leone as well. “We hear rumors that NIH have reached an agreement with the Sierra Leone government to conduct the ZMapp trial in any Ebola treatment unit—even those that have trials already running,” says Peter Horby, the lead investigator of the TKM-Ebola study. “If this is correct, it will jeopardize ongoing trials and lead to conflict.”Lane says that the government of Sierra Leone decides what treatment units will participate, and that Port Loko, where the TKM-Ebola study is running, is currently not included in the list. “We defer to our local partners,” Lane says.However, Lane argues that patients should have access to the most promising experimental drugs available, and that the animal data for ZMapp look better than those for TKM-Ebola. Horby agrees with that assessment, but says it is not clear how that translates into humans. (He says his team offered to test ZMapp in Sierra Leone but did not get access to the product because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not approve the study design, in which patients who receive TKM-Ebola are compared with Ebola patients at other treatment units who did not get the drug.) “It would not be sensible or ethical to stop a well-running trial of a promising product for an alternative promising product,” Horby says.The start of the ring vaccination study in Guinea on Monday came exactly 1 year after the first case of the deadly disease was diagnosed in the country, alerting the world to what has become the worst Ebola outbreak ever seen. Setting up the trial has been a huge challenge, given the bad infrastructure in Guinea and the widespread distrust of the health system among the population, Kieny says. “This is a great success,” she says. “There has been great community engagement and no problems with violence.”*The Ebola Files: Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the Ebola virus and the current outbreak freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more

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first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Humans domesticated dogs long before any other animal, yet researchers don’t agree on where or when this happened. One study of the DNA of modern dogs and wolves suggests that dogs arose less than 16,000 years ago in Southeast Asia, but another genetic analysis of ancient dogs and wolves pegs the event to Europe as long as 32,000 years ago. Archaeological studies have been similarly contentious, with some groups claiming that Russian and Belgian skulls dated to about 30,000 years ago represent the world’s first dogs, whereas others argue that the oldest definitive dog skulls are 16,000-year-old craniums found in Russia and Germany.Dalén hopes the new study will put some of the debate to rest. When he and his colleagues dated the small Taymyr bone and sequenced its genome, they discovered that the specimen belonged to a male wolf that lived about 35,000 years ago. The DNA, when compared with that of modern and ancient dogs and wolves, indicated that this individual lived during a critical period in canine history, when an ancient population of wolves divided into lineages that would eventually give rise to the Taymyr wolf, modern gray wolves, and today’s dogs.“It looks like a three-way split that all happened around the same time,” says lead author Pontus Skoglund, a postdoc at Harvard University. According to the genetic mutation rate the researchers calculated by comparing the DNA of the Taymyr wolf with that of dogs and other wolves, the lineage that gave rise to today’s dogs arose somewhere between 27,000 and 40,000 years ago, the team reports online today in Current Biology.      “I like that time period,” says Wayne, whose own work indicates that dogs arose in Europe about this time. “That’s when modern humans first entered Europe and began encountering wolves that became the raw material for dogs,” he says, referring to the older end of the time frame. “It’s a good paper,” agrees Peter Savolainen, a geneticist at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, who was not involved with the work. His team’s analysis of modern dog and wolf DNA suggests that the wolf and dog lineages split off from each other about 32,000 years ago. “It’s really nice that the modern and ancient DNA matches up,” he says.Still, neither Savolainen nor Wayne—who have argued over whether dogs arose in Asia or Europe—thinks the study provides clarity on that debate or whether dogs were domesticated multiple times, as some scientists have proposed. “There’s still a lot of open questions,” Skoglund agrees.Also unclear is whether Siberian huskies and Greenland sledge dogs—both considered ancient breeds—were among the first types of dogs. When Skoglund, Dalén, and their colleagues compared the DNA of the Taymyr wolf with that of 48 dog breeds, they found that Greenland sledge dogs and Siberian huskies shared more ancestry with the Taymyr wolf than did any other breed. That could mean that these two breeds arose soon after dogs split from wolves. But it could also be a genetic red herring, especially if these breeds mated with descendants of the Taymyr wolf in recent history. Still, Dalén says, “my hunch is that both are a fairly early form of dog.” Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img For 6 weeks in the summer of 2010, a hardy band of scientists floated down a river on the Taymyr Peninsula, a bare hump of Siberia that juts out into the Arctic Ocean. They were on a hunt for ice age treasures: animal bones that had tumbled from the melting permafrost along the riverbank. There, among mammoth tusks and other remains, Love Dalén spotted what he thought was a reindeer rib. But when the evolutionary geneticist analyzed it back at the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, he realized that the 5-cm-long specimen belonged instead to a wolf—one that could shed new light on the history of dog domestication. “This will be one of the critical pieces,” says Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved with the work. Love Dalén A region of the Taymyr Peninsula near where the wolf bone was found. last_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgA report issued today addresses the sexual harassment allegations roiling the University of Rochester in New York. Yet many of the complainants and their lawyer, Ann Olivarius, a senior partner at the law firm McAllister Olivarius in Maidenhead, U.K., challenged the new report vigorously at a late-afternoon press conference in Rochester. They noted, among other things, that the report repeatedly describes Jaeger’s actions as “inappropriate” and “offensive” and that it conceded that because of this, some women “actively avoided pursuing academic opportunities with Jaeger.” Michael Doolittle/Alamy Stock Photo Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Meredith WadmanJan. 11, 2018 , 2:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe University of Rochester president resigns as outside attorney issues report on sexual harassment casecenter_img Email “Given the significant length of the [207-page] report, the board and university administrators will take additional time to carefully consider its findings and recommendations before determining what specific actions the University will take,” the university said in a statement. Earlier in the day, before he learned the contents of the new report, according to U of R, President Joel Seligman announced to the school’s Board of Trustees that he will resign effective 28 February, after steering the institution for more than 12 years.The trustees issued their own statement today, writing: “We Trustees express our heartfelt apology to anyone who was hurt by the actions of any university employee, or who felt intimidated, excluded, or harassed.” White was hired by a special committee constituted in September 2017 by the university’s Board of Trustees to investigate the original complaints made to the university in 2013 and 2016 and with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in August 2017 against Jaeger, how the university investigated them, and whether complainants experienced retribution from university officials.In December 2017, eight current or former professors and a former graduate student in the university’s widely respected Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (BCS), where Jaeger is a tenured professor, sued the university, Seligman, and Provost Robert Clark alleging retaliation, defamation, and (in two cases) breach of contract after they criticized the university’s investigations of Jaeger in 2013 and 2016.“Zero tolerance should go hand in hand with two other things: due process and proportionality,” White said at a press conference this afternoon, after the report was made public.White and her team’s report also found no evidence that the university retaliated against the complainants. “Many of the statements and actions taken by the university were in our view not taken to retaliate … but rather as [a] good faith effort to lessen the divisiveness within BCS,” White said. “We think that the university acted in good faith … and that the steps it took to navigate an unusually difficult situation were reasonable.”White stressed that her report evaluated sexual harassment through a legal lens. The fact that she did not find it occurred in Jaeger’s case “is a legal conclusion, not a moral or social judgment,” she said.White’s team interviewed more than 140 witnesses; reviewed more than 6000 documents, including emails; and analyzed the university’s policies, procedures, and processes dealing with intimate relationships and sexual harassment against 18 peer institutions. Interviewees included 64 past and present students and postdocs at the university. But the complainants declined to cooperate with her investigation, challenging her impartiality given that the university hired her. (Her firm is being paid $4.5 million for its 3.5 months of work producing the report.) White, however, said the lawsuit and complaints filed with the university and EEOC, along with her interviews of other witnesses, provided enough information to render her judgment.“The thrust of their report is that many bad things happened at [U of R] … but no legal liability attaches to the university,” Olivarius responded. “In fact, there is substantial case law the report ignores that strongly supports the idea that the university is absolutely liable for the hostile environment created by Jaeger’s actions.”The report “admits he sent pictures of his penis to a student and a former student … that he blurred professional boundaries with sexual banter. … The report describes Florian Jaeger as the predator I know him to be,” said Celeste Kidd, an assistant professor in the BCS department and one of the complainants.The accusers also challenged White’s conclusions that they were not retaliated against by the university. “They attacked our privacy. They attacked our reputations. They attacked [us] to the point that our colleagues [were no longer willing to work with us],” said Jessica Cantlon, an associate professor who is in the process of leaving the department for a post at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. “They came after us and they’re coming after us now by paying $4.5 million to a legal defense firm.”White’s team also found that a 2017 policy adopted by U of R is stricter than at many other institutions, as it prohibits any intimate relationships between faculty members and undergraduates; among the peer institutions, Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, was one of the few with a stricter policy, White said, prohibiting faculty from having intimate relationships with graduate students in the same program, department or division.*Update, 12 January, 9:30 a.m.:  A statement from Jaeger was added to the story*Correction/Update, 11 January, 6:40 p.m.: This story has been updated with responses from the complainants. An earlier version of this article stated that U of R’s policy on intimate relationships between faculty and students is as strict as Stanford’s. In fact, Stanford’s is stricter.​ Shortly before it became public today that the president of the University of Rochester (U of R) in New York will resign next month, an outside investigator hired by the school to examine its handling of sexual harassment allegations against linguistic researcher T. Florian Jaeger announced her conclusion that Jaeger did not violate university policies or sexually harass students and that accounts by his accusers are “exaggerated and misleading in many respects.”“We … do not believe that any potential claimant or plaintiff would be able to sustain a legal claim for sexual harassment in violation of [federal law],” read the report by investigators, led by Mary Jo White, a partner at the law firm Debevoise & Plimpton in New York City who is a former U.S. attorney and former chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission. “Despite being labeled as a ‘sexual predator’ by his accusers, there have never been allegations of sexual assault, unwanted groping, any use of force, or exhibitionism outside of consensual relationships, and we have found no evidence of such behavior ever occurring,” the report continues.In a statement, Jaeger apologized to his students and colleagues for the “distress and disruption” that his behavior and the resulting investigations caused, adding: “This report does not exonerate me, but neither does it give merit to many of the worst accusations made against me. … It would have been vastly easier for the University to find against me, quelling the controversy this issue has caused, than it has been for it to repeatedly test the validity of these allegations. I appreciate their commitment to seeking out the truth.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgCanada’s Klondike has yielded an amazing discovery: the mummified remains of a wolf puppy and part of a caribou, with fur and tissue still intact. They are believed to have lived more than 50,000 years ago. Researchers believe the pup died when it was roughly eight weeks old.This was not a scientific dig. Gold miners found the remains by accident. The region, once the scene of a late 19th century frenzied gold rush, is still being mined.Klondike Gold Rush.The CBC has reported that the specimen was found at a placer gold mine owned by Tony Beets, who’s known for appearances on the reality TV show Gold Rush.“The ancient Ice Age specimens, both radiocarbon dated to over 50,000 years old, were discovered and reported by placer mining operations in the Klondike region and recovered by members of the Yukon Paleontology Program for research and analysis,” according to a Canadian government statement released in mid-September 2018.The mummified Ice Age wolf pup was discovered by gold miners. Photo by Government of Canada, Canadian Conservation Institute“Remarkably well-preserved, with hair, skin and muscle tissue intact, specimens of this quality are extremely rare and have garnered a great deal of international scientific interest,” the statement continued. “These world-class finds shed light on Yukon’s fascinating ice age history and will help us understand how these long gone creatures lived in the environment they inhabited.”Researchers say it’s rare to find for fur, skin, and muscle tissues preserved in this way.Elsa Panciroli, a paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh, told the Guardian: “Ice Age wolf bones are relatively common in the Yukon, but having an animal preserved with skin and fur is just exceptional … It’s an evocative glimpse into the Ice Age world.”It is extremely rare for fur, skin and muscle tissues to be preserved. Photo by Yukon GovernmentSome 50,000 years ago, the region was a freezing tundra. Long-extinct animals, such as woolly mammoths and western camels, roamed as well as mammals whose descendants populate the Arctic territories today.The CBC reported that the remains were found in an area that includes an 80,000-year-old volcanic ash bed.The caribou calf. Photo by Yukon Government“These are ashes that are found in the permafrost from volcanoes in Alaska that erupted during the ice age,” said Yukon government paleontologist Grant Zazula. “We think this is some of the oldest mummified soft tissue in the entire world.”Both of the specimens have been accepted by the Canadian Conservation Institute. The mummified animals are now on display at the Dänojà Zho Cultural Centre in Dawson City, where they’ll stay for the rest of September.The Yukon government says the specimens will be incorporated into an exhibit at the Beringia Interpretive Centre in Whitehorse.Yukon welcome sign.About 30 years ago, miners uncovered the remains a 26,000-year-old Yukon horse, but as Zazula tells the Canadian Press, no significant soft-tissue specimens had emerged since.“We sometimes get jealous because in Siberia, … it seems like they find a new woolly mammoth carcass every summer,” Zazula says. “But we never seem to find those in the Yukon or Alaska.”This summer, the perfectly preserved remains of a 40,000-year-old foal were discovered by a team of scientists who were searching the melting permafrost of Siberia for evidence of the ancient woolly mammoths.The mummified foal, which is about 37 inches tall, was so well-preserved that the skin, the tail, the hooves, and even the hairs in the animal’s nostrils and around its hooves are were visible.The foal was found during an expedition to the Verkhoyansk district of Yakutia and was dug up from its grave which was about 100 feet beneath the original surface of the depression.Read another story from us: Extinct Predator Cave Lions Could be Brought Back to LifeThe discovery was made by a team working inside the Batagai depression, a massive thermokarst crater that is nicknamed “the Mouth of Hell.” Locals in the Yakutia region see this crater as superstitious, and regard it as the gateway to the underworld. Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more

July 20, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgYears after purchasing a house in Toulouse, France, the owner focused on an old painting stored in the attic. It was coated in dust and stained by a water leak, so it seemed unlikely to be worth anything. But to be on the safe side, in 2014 he alerted an art appraiser, Eric Turquin, based in Paris. It took several years to get the report, and when it arrived, the news was astounding. The painting is “Judith and Holofernes,” believed to have been painted in 1607, and a lost masterpiece by Caravaggio. France has put an export ban on the painting to stop it leaving the country while further investigations are performed.At a press conference it was announced that the restored painting will be auctioned in Toulouse, where it is expected to sell for up to €150 million, or $171 million.Caravaggio, Judith Beheading Holofernes (c. 1598-1599)“The large, remarkably well-preserved canvas of the beheading of the general Holofernes by Judith, from the apocryphal Book of Judith, was painted between 1600 and 1610, specialists estimate,” reported The Guardian. It depicts a scene from the Book of Judith, from Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox versions of the Old Testament, in which Judith seduces an enemy general in his tent before beheading him.“This is the greatest painting I’ve ever found,” Turquin told CNN. “It’s very violent. It’s almost unbearable. But he’s an artist who embodies the text — he makes the text living.”Judith with the head of Holofernes by Carlo Francesco Nuvolone, second half of 17th centuryTurquin also said the painting has “the light, the energy, typical of Caravaggio, without mistakes, done with a sure hand and a pictorial style that makes it authentic.”The painting’s existence was known before its discovery due to mentions of it in two letters dating back to 1607 to the Duke of Mantua; a 1617 will of art dealer and painter Louis Finson; and an estate inventory of Abraham Vinck of Antwerp in 1619, according to the Robb Report. “It was thought to have been displayed at some point in Antwerp in 1689, but since then there has not been any mention of the painting until its recent discovery, tucked away in a dusty French attic.”Self Portrait, by Louis FinsonTurquin got the backing for the painting’s creator from a top Caravaggio expert, Nicola Spinoza, former director of the Naples museum.“The third expert I met told me that it was not only a Caravaggio, but also a masterpiece,” Turquin said. “Judith Beheading Holofernes must be considered the most important painting, by far, to have emerged in the last 20 years by one of the great masters.”A portrait of the Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da CaravaggioThe export ban means this painting cannot leave the country for 30 months while it is studied, and to allow French national museums enough time for possibly buying it. The Louvre Museum has spent three weeks studying it.The painting shows up in an inventory of the estate of a man named Abraham Vinck, carried out in Antwerp in 1619. After 1619, the fate of the painting became a mystery, though according to the Colnaghi gallery, it could have been shown in Antwerp in 1689. “We don’t know where it goes after 1689,” Turquin said.Musée du Louvre, Paris, FranceCaravaggio himself led a violent, notorious life. When the artist died at the age of 39 in 1610, some said it was of malaria, others syphilis, still others that he was poisoned by his enemies.Read another story from us: Leonardo Da Vinci’s Only Finished Sculpture Finally IdentifiedThe artist was particularly passionate about fighting. One chronicler wrote, “After a fortnight’s work he will swagger about for a month or two with a sword at his side and a servant following him, from one ball-court to the next, ever ready to engage in a fight or an argument, so that it is most awkward to get along with him.”Caravaggio’s paintings revolutionized art with their compelling combination of realistic human anatomy and intense use of light.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img Related News 1 Comment(s) Major chunk of agriculture sales should go to farmers: Adi Godrej By Express News Service |New Delhi | Updated: July 10, 2019 7:04:40 am Advertising Farmers suicides, Farmers suicides during UPA rule, parshottam rupala, agriculture minister narendra singh tomar, Farmers suicides UPA, Farmers suicides BJP, farmer loan waiver, india news, Indian express Rupala claimed that an audit conducted after the announcement of the loan waiver scheme found that people who were not farmers were also given the waiver. (Representational)Union Minister of State for Agriculture Parshottam Rupala on Tuesday said that suicides by farmers increased after a loan waiver of Rs 70,000 crore was announced by the UPA government in 2008. BKU: Since loan waiver rollout, 430 Punjab farmers committed suicide in a year Responding to a query by BJP member Radha Mohan Singh during Question Hour in the Lok Sabha, Rupala also claimed that an audit conducted after the announcement of the loan waiver scheme found that people who were not farmers were also given the waiver.Congress MP Gaurav Gogoi sought more details on farmer suicides and alleged the government was hiding data. However, Rupala maintained that the detailed reply given in writing by the government contained the data.Replying to a question on whether the Supreme Court had suggested that the government bring out a national policy to control farmers suicides, Agriculture Minister Narendra Singh Tomar said the court in its order on July 6, 2017, stated an issue like this could not be dealt with overnight. Therefore, it was justified for the Attorney-General to seek time to work out schemes appropriately.Tomar said agriculture being a state subject, state governments undertake development of perspective plans and ensure, effective implementation of programmes and schemes. The Government of India supplements efforts of the states through various schemes and programmes, he said. As garlic prices fall, Rajasthan records five farmer suicides last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Top News Written by Smita Nair | Panaji | Published: July 16, 2019 2:10:32 am Goa political crisis, Goa forward party, goa congress mla resignations, Goa bjp, goa forward party support, indian express Goa Chief Minister Pramod Sawant. (PTI)The traditional alignment of the Opposition on the left of the Assembly Speaker and treasury benches on the right saw adjustments on the first day of monsoon session in Goa Assembly, with Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party (MGP) and Goa Forward, earlier part of the BJP-led government, now on the Opposition side, and Chandrakant Kavlekar, until Wednesday Leader of Opposition from the Congress, now occupying the Deputy Chief Minister’s chair. NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertising Manohar Azgaonkar, formerly of MGP, is the other Deputy CM.The chair of Leader of Opposition remained vacant, while four ministers attended the proceedings without being allotted portfolios. Chief Minister Pramod Sawant told the House that he will answer questions on departments earlier held by the four ministers who have been dropped.Speaker Rajesh Patnekar confirmed to the media that questions were rearranged since some questions were from then Opposition members who are now in the government. A question from Francisco Silveira, thus, received a written reply from Minister for Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Services Mauvin Godinho – both MLAs now in the treasury benches. Advertising Silveira, who was with the Congress when he had drafted the question, asked whether the government “checks the quality of beef sold in St Andre constituency”. The minister replied in positive. On beef coming from other states, Godinho replied that beef from Karnataka is examined and certificate is given.Congress leaders took the matter of soil erosion as their first question in Question Hour, with Chief Minister Sawant promising that a scientific agency will be appointed to probe the declining beach beds across Goa. Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Post Comment(s)last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img Related News Thachil was speaking at a talk titled ‘Why poor vote for elite parties’ hosted by the School of Development Studies at Tata Institute of Social Sciences on Tuesday.The Sewa wing of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), which has been active for years at the grassroots in the Hindi heartland, has also played a major role in the elections. This is a major reason why 33 per cent Dalit voters voted for the BJP, said Thachil.Sewa outfits of the RSS such as Sewa Bharati And Vanwasi Kalyan Ashram have played a major role in the 1990s and early 2000s in increasing the BJP’s presence among Dalits and adivasis. Thachil, an associate professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, has also authored a book titled Elite Parties, Poor Voters, examining the rise of the BJP among poor voters in India.“It is hard to isolate the BJP’s win from the important structural advantages that the party enjoys. The most obvious is money. The Association for Democratic Reforms, an independent election think tank, tracked the incomes of India’s seven largest political parties in 2017-2018. They found that the BJP’s income from donation was more than twice the combined income of the other six parties,” said Thachil.Thachil added that while the role of the RSS may be changing, it did not seem that it was losing its clout. “Modi has repeatedly stated that he is committed to the RSS and his history is personally rooted in the RSS. This is in some way a consolidation of the RSS in the BJP. It would be a mistake to assume that the BJP doesn’t benefit from the RSS. Before, the RSS had a lot of leverage which is now equally commanded by the BJP,” he said. Day after Ramlal’s exit, BL Santhosh appointed to key BJP post J&K cops overhaul village defence committees, PDP says Centre design to arm RSS workers rss, rss.org, Tariq Thachil, lok sabha elections, sewa dal, rss sewa dal, lok sabha elections 2019, lok sabha elections rss Sewa outfits of the RSS such as Sewa Bharati And Vanwasi Kalyan Ashram have played a major role in the 1990s and early 2000s in increasing the BJP’s presence among Dalits and adivasis.EVEN AS the 2019 Lok Sabha elections signalled a popular leader powering his party to victory, the ‘Modi Wave’ narrative could be premature, said political scientist Tariq Thachil. Advertising By Express News Service |Mumbai | Published: July 17, 2019 1:39:17 am Advertising Towards social politics Post Comment(s)last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img By Adrian ChoDec. 3, 2018 , 5:45 PM Cosmic cacophony of colliding black holes continues SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes project center_img Infinitesimal ripples in space called gravitational waves have revealed four more instances in which two massive black holes have spiraled into each other and merged with mind-bending violence. Spied between 30 November 2016 and 25 August 2017, the events bring the total number of black hole mergers to 10, report physicists with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo gravitational wave detector. With help from Virgo’s detector in Pisa, Italy, LIGO’s twin detectors—in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington—are seeing such mergers about once every 15 days of observations, physicists report today at a workshop at the University of Maryland in College Park.Gravitational waves are mind-bogglingly small distortions of space-time itself that can be set off when two massive objects whirl into each other. LIGO researchers electrified the world in February 2016 when they reported the first observation of such waves, which emanated from two black holes 29 and 36 times as massive as the sun, spiraling together. Twenty months later, LIGO and Virgo wowed the world again when they reported the merger of two much smaller neutron stars. For astronomers, that collision was even more of a gold mine because it produced a gamma ray burst and other electromagnetic signals that, for example, revealed the birth of copious heavy nuclei. (Because they involve no matter, black hole mergers produce only invisible gravitational waves.) Just over a year ago, the developers of LIGO shared the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. Virgo came on in 2017 and has also seen three of 11 total sources, helping pinpoint their locations on the sky.The latest observations set some new records. In particular, a merger spotted on 29 July 2017 was a staggering 9 billion light-years from Earth, and it involved black holes 50 and 34 times as massive as the sun. Physicists still aren’t sure how such big stellar mass black holes form or how they pair. For example, scientists don’t know whether they start out as pairs of stars that collapse into their own black holes or instead start as individual black holes that somehow latch onto each other. The details from a bigger sample of such events could help sort out the correct models. LIGO and Virgo are currently down for maintenance and tuning, and they should resume their searching early next year.last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgKeenan Skelly is vice president of global partnerships and security evangelist for Circadence.In this exclusive interview, Skelly shares her insights on the state of cybersecurity, the importance of establishing global norms, and the abundance of opportunities in the field. Circadence VP Keenan SkellyTechNewsWorld: Could you describe the trajectory of your career? How has it evolved over time?Keenan Skelly: I started out in the Army as an explosive ordnance disposal technician, and I had an interesting career. I was last stationed at Andrews Air Force Base, where we focused on chemical and nuclear weapons. It wasn’t very cyber-related.While I was doing that job, I happened to be at the White House on 9/11, and in that capacity I got to see the national response plan acted out. It brought me back to my past before the military, working for the Red Cross and responding to large-scale crisis incidents.I was interested in transitioning the skills I got from the military, so I went to work for the infrastructure protection division of the Department of Homeland Security, where I ran vulnerability assessments across the country — nuclear, chemical, water — looking at these from a personnel and a physical security standpoint, as well as an information security standpoint. We saw then that information security was the single point of failure across all these sectors. Despite that, we weren’t really providing a lot of assets for the critical infrastructure community.Here we are, 15 years later, and a lot of the same issues are still being played out, but on a larger scale. That pushed me in the direction of learning more about information and cybersecurity.I went back to school and got a bachelor’s degree in information technology and came back to the field to promote some of these things at the critical infrastructure level. Since then, I’ve been working with smaller companies on ideas about how to address the cybersecurity issue.TNW: Why do you have a passion for cybersecurity?Skelly: One part is that it’s only a few times in the history of the U.S. and in specific domains do you have the opportunity to make decisions and have a lasting effect on that domain. If you talk about the nuclear domain and chemical domain, the opportunity to impact those domains does not happen regularly.In terms of information cybersecurity, we’re right in the middle of it right now. We’re just figuring out what global norms should be. The things that we put in place — whether they’re policies or advanced technologies, are going to shape this domain for many years to come. That’s really exciting to me, being able to be part of that change and influence this domain.The other part is that it impacts every bit of our lives, more and more every day. Just in the last 10 years, my personal reliance on technology and the Web has grown exponentially, and our reliance on cyber is a double-edged sword.We’re able to communicate much more efficiently with people all over the world, but we’re more vulnerable to attacks. We need to figure out what the best way is to move forward, and what things we need to scale back on.TNW: In what ways is working in the business world different from military and government work?Skelly: I enjoyed working for the government and military for the sense of purpose, and because I was able to make changes that were seen across the environment.As I’ve gotten older, I’ve realized that rapid change and innovation typically come from smaller, more agile organizations. I’ve embraced that, and I enjoy working with smaller companies that have new ways of thinking about complex ideas like artificial intelligence and machine learning. That really inspires me.In terms of predictability, when you’re working for the government or military, there’s a cadence to processes, and that’s part of why it doesn’t lend itself to being agile. That’s what I like about the business world — the ability to innovate new ideas and technologies and get them out to people more quickly.TNW: What are some of the most challenging things facing us in the world of security?Skelly: One of the big challenges we have in cybersecurity is norms in cyberspace. People like to refer to cyber as the wild, wild west. There are all these things going on, and people are testing the water. But this is not the first domain where that’s happened. We saw similar things with nuclear weapons and chemical weapons, and now we’re seeing that in cybersecruity.As a community we need to draw that line in the sand about what’s appropriate in cyberspace and what’s not appropriate. We need to determine what that line is. Cyberspace can be weaponized.I often use the IED threat that we faced in the Middle East as a similar construct. The threat was changing so rapidly that it was difficult to get the message out to the troops about how to stay safe. We had to change our way of thinking about the problem, and that’s kind of where we’re at with cyber.Today, the biggest problem that people are working on is phishing or ransomware, but there will be new threats. We have to change our paradigm about how we think about the cybersecurity problem.TNW: You do volunteer work for Team Rubicon and Red Cross Disaster Services. Why do you see this volunteer work as important?Skelly: Team Rubicon is for wounded warriors who have specific skills in crisis management, and when something happens in the country — a flood or hurricane or train wreck — you can be picked to respond to it. It depends on your individual skills.When I was younger, I started volunteering for the Red Cross Disaster Services in my hometown. Within a couple months of doing that, I was a part of two separate train crashes, and those really influenced the person I am today. They taught me how to react and how we can, as a society, better respond to these incidents. It’s helped me to be a more responsible human being, both in life-and-death situations and in business situations.TNW: What advice would you give to girls and women who are interested in getting into the security field?Skelly: One of the big things I stress is that security is not just about the person sitting behind a laptop with a hoodie. That’s a very dated version. Because cyber is so pervasive, you can have a job in cybersecurity in just about any job. There is no one-size-fits-all for your aspirations in cybersecurity.You may have hundreds of different options. I do recommend that you be hungry for knowledge. There are so many tools and techniques and ever-changing threats, and you have to be interested in all of it. If you are, you’re going to be way ahead of the game.center_img Vivian Wagner has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2008. Her main areas of focus are technology, business, CRM, e-commerce, privacy, security, arts, culture and diversity. She has extensive experience reporting on business and technology for a varietyof outlets, including The Atlantic, The Establishment and O, The Oprah Magazine. She holds a PhD in English with a specialty in modern American literature and culture. She received a first-place feature reporting award from the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists.Email Vivian.last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgThe inspiration for the Xbox Adaptive Controller was a 2014 social media post featuring a photo of a custom gaming controller made by Warfighter Engaged, a nonprofit organization that develops gaming controllers for disabled veterans.It caught the attention of a Microsoft engineer, which resulted in a hackathon at Microsoft’s 2015 Ability Summit, where the first prototype of a controller for people with disabilities was developed. Now, three years later, the final product is about ready for the market.Unlike the standard unit that is held in two hands, the XboxAdaptive Controller utilizes a flat yet compact design that allowsit to rest on a table.In the place of small joysticks that typically are controlled with auser’s thumb are two round light-touch-enabled pads that players canuse by rolling their palms on them or pressing with their hands. These offeressentially the same level of precision as the thumb joysticks on anormal controller, but they have an added option of providing an audiblecue for another layer of sensory input.The Xbox Adaptive Controller also features a standard D-pad, an Xbox power button, and a profile button that allows users to shift among several mapping options.Where the Xbox Adaptive Controller offers serious flexibility is inits ability to work with other existing accessibility tools, includingthose that offer air-power input methods or foot pedals. These canconnect to one the 19 3.5mm ports on the back panel of the controller.Each of these devices can be mapped to the unit, and can be modifiedon the fly without even pausing the game. Microsoft on Thursday introduced its new Xbox Adaptive Controller, designed specifically for gamers with disabilities. The new hardware can be used for game play with an Xbox One console or Windows 10 PC, and it offers Bluetooth plug-and-play compatibility.It supports Xbox Wireless Controller features such as buttonremapping, and it connects to external buttons, switches, joysticks and mounts. Microsoft developed the Xbox Adaptive Controller to enable gamers with physicaldisabilities to customize their respective setups. Special Advantages To get this product to market actually may have taken some uniqueadaptation — not in anything technical, but rather in the kind of thinking that is typical ofcompanies such as Microsoft.”We have been around 14 years, but we spent some 10 years trying tothink we were helping gamers with disabilities,” said Mark Barlet,founder of AbleGamers.”Now we have spent the last few years trying to convince the marketthat people with disabilities played games, and had to convince thecompanies to put real effort into catering to those withdisabilities,” he told TechNewsWorld.”However, we noted that the management at these companies never sawthe why, because it was only a small portion of the population, so ittook a while to convince the industry that this was an untappedmarket,” Barlet added. “Finally we had people that were passionately roaming the halls for years who were now in a position to make it happen.”The advocacy, fact and reality finally converged three years ago, said Barlet.”We did warn Microsoft that it won’t sell millions of these, but thatthey’ll get these in the hands of everyone who wants them,” he noted.”Why wouldn’t Microsoft want more dedicated gamers in their camp?” The Xbox Adaptive Controller is designed from the ground up to be aunique controller for those with special needs.”Gaming — and especially online games — is an important outlet forpeople with disabilities,” said Roger Entner, principal analyst at Recon Analytics.”They can often interact with others without having their disability play a role in the interaction,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Particularly as we move to technologies like virtual reality, gaming can be one ofthe few ways a disabled person can step away from their disabilities,depending on what they are,” said Rob Enderle, principal analyst atthe Enderle Group.”For instance someone without legs or missing an arm or most of theirfingers can still play a video game — if they have the right controller — as well or better than someone who isn’t disabled,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Any physical deformities are hidden behind the game avatar so thedisabled person can, for a short time in game, experience what it islike to be treated for how they do — not how they look,” Enderle said.”Video games distract everyone from reality, and this can often be veryimportant for someone struggling with the unfairness of a disability.So, combined, video games can be incredibly important to someonechallenged by a disability.” Specialty Controller Innovative Adaptations Peter Suciu has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2012. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile phones, displays, streaming media, pay TV and autonomous vehicles. He has written and edited for numerous publications and websites, including Newsweek, Wired and FoxNews.com.Email Peter. Serious Control Panel Microsoft partnered with several high-profile global organizations dedicated to providing accessibility to those with physical disabilities: The AbleGamers Charity, The Cerebral Palsy Foundation, Craig Hospital, SpecialEffect, and Warfighter Engaged. Microsoft developers also worked directly with gamers who have limited mobility.The Xbox Adaptive Controller will be available later this year for about US$100. As the Xbox Adaptive Controller is designed to allow for greaterflexibility with other input devices, it also could be used forthose who prefer something beyond the normal controllers. In somecases, it could lead to gamers trying to get a potentiallyunfair advantage.”Adaptive controllers could actually provide advantages in gamingbecause they, in theory, better match the controller to the personusing it,” suggested Enderle.”Right now, game controllers are pretty generic but people come in allshapes and sizes,” he pointed out.”In other competitive sports we have, at the highest levels, customtools designed for the individual athlete, but not so much withcomputer gaming yet,” said Enderle. “These adaptive controllers, while initially focused on disabilities, could eventually open up a market for controllers that arespecifically designed for the gamer that uses them.”In most cases, the biggest advantage almost certainly will be openingup the world to those who have struggled just to enjoy the games for fun.Still, “if a controller for people with physical limitations gives someone anedge in a competition, all players will use it,” said Recon Analytics’ Entner.”I have personally played with quite a few players with disabilities,but only found out after quite a while,” he said. “Many relish thatthey are treated like everyone else when they are behind a screen andinteract with everyone unimpaired by the perception of others.”last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgDividing breast cancer cell. Image Credit: royaltystockphoto.com / Shutterstock Study leader, Professor Nick Turner of the Institute of Cancer Research said, “These results indicate that we can now offer women with incurable breast cancer some precious extra survival time before their condition worsens. It is very encouraging.” The study involved a total of 521 women with advanced, hormone-sensitive breast cancer. The researchers attempted to see if the combination therapy worked better than conventional chemotherapy.Results of the study funded by palbociclib’s manufacturer Pfizer, showed that women who were given a combination therapy survived for an average of 34.9 months. This is an average of 6.9 months longer than women treated only with hormonal therapy. Three years after the study enrolment 49.6 percent of the participants who had received the combination therapy were still alive compared to 40.8 percent of the participants who had received only hormone therapy.Authors concluded in their study, “Among patients with hormone-receptor–positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer who had sensitivity to previous endocrine therapy, treatment with palbociclib–fulvestrant resulted in longer overall survival than treatment with placebo–fulvestrant. The differences in overall survival in the entire trial group were not significant.”Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsStudy 2Yet another combination of an immunotherapy drug atezolizumab with standard chemotherapy was found to prolong life of patients with advanced triple-negative breast cancers.This study titled, “Atezolizumab and Nab-Paclitaxel in Advanced Triple-Negative Breast Cancer,” was led by Professor Peter Schmid, clinical director of breast cancer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital and professor of cancer medicine at Queen Mary University of London and the results of the study were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. According to Schmid this study is a “massive step forward” and could soon “lead to a cure in some patients and may apply in the treatment of other forms of breast cancers in the future.”The researchers explained that the chemotherapy made the tumour vulnerable and the immunotherapy then targeted the breast cancer cells. In this trial 451 patients were included in two groups – one to receive atezolizumab plus nab-paclitaxel or placebo plus nab-paclitaxel. The patients all had untreated metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. The patients were all followed up for an average 12.9 months.Results showed that progression-free survival was 7.2 months with atezolizumab plus nab-paclitaxel and it was 5.5 months with placebo plus nab-paclitaxel. Median overall survival was 21.3 months with the combination therapy and it was 17.6 months with paclitaxel along with placebo. Side effects were seen among 15.9 percent patients on the combination and 8.2 percent on paclitaxel alone. At 25 months after the study 60 percent of the combination group were still alive. The combination treatment was found to reduce the risk of the cancer progress by up to 40 percent.According to Professor Schmid, “Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer. It is particularly tragic that those affected are often young. I’m thrilled that by using a combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy we are able to significantly extend lives compared to the standard treatment of chemotherapy alone.” By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDOct 21 2018Study 1A new study has shown that a combination of drugs palbociclib, along with hormone therapy can significantly increase the survival among women with advanced breast cancer.The new study titled, “Overall Survival with Palbociclib and Fulvestrant in Advanced Breast Cancer,” was published in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and the results of the PALOMA-3 trial were also presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology congress in Munich, Germany. The researchers from Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, found that women with advanced breast cancer treated with this combination lived for seven months longer than those who were treated with hormonal therapy alone. Among women who had earlier responded favourably to hormone therapy, the average survival when palbociclib and hormone therapy was administered together was around 10 months.center_img Source:https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1810527 and https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1809615last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img Source:https://news.rutgers.edu/babies-born-home-have-more-diverse-beneficial-bacteria-study-finds/20181030#.W9iUzpNKi70 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 31 2018Infants born at home have more diverse bacteria in their guts and feces, which may affect their developing immunity and metabolism, according to a study in Scientific Reports.Understanding why babies born at home have more diverse microbiota for at least a month after birth, compared with those born in a hospital, could help prevent disease later in life. The human microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria, fungi and viruses that live on and in our bodies, many of which benefit our health and prevent chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes, asthma and gut inflammatory disorders. Microbes transmitted from mother to baby help prevent chronic disease.Related StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerNon-pathogenic bacteria engineered as Trojan Horse to treat tumors from within”The reasons for the differences between infants born at home versus in hospitals are not known, but we speculate that common hospital interventions like early infant bathing and antibiotic eye prophylaxis or environmental factors – like the aseptic environment of the hospital – may be involved,” said senior author Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, a professor in Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology and Department of Anthropology.In the study, researchers followed 35 infants and their mothers for a month after birth. Fourteen infants were born at home (four of them in water) and 21 in the hospital. All 35 infants were delivered vaginally without interventions (including no maternal antibiotic treatment) and were exclusively breastfed. All infants were delivered by midwives who supported mothers, and they all had skin-to-skin contact with their babies, and began breastfeeding shortly after birth.In a related analysis, fecal samples of month-old infants born in a hospital showed greater inflammatory gene expression in a human epithelial cell model, compared with infants born at home. Epithelial cells cover organ linings, skin and mouths.While more research is needed, the study suggests that revamping the hospital environment for non-high risk births, so it more closely approximates home conditions, may be beneficial.last_img read more

July 19, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 21 2018In a Geriatrics & Gerontology International study of 51 individuals living with dementia who attended community-based adult day health centers, behavioral observations of a music intervention showed a positive change in mood and a decrease in agitation. Participants demonstrated significant increases in joy, eye contact, eye movement, being engaged, and talkativeness, and a decrease in sleeping and moving or dancing.For the study, each participant listened to personalized music using headphones, which prompted social interaction with one another and/or the researchers while listening. After 20 minutes, participants were brought back to the center’s usual activities and were observed for 20 more minutes.”The promising results of this affordable and meaningful intervention have propelled our team to develop an online training for direct care workers in long-term care communities,” said lead author Dr. Emily Ihara, of George Mason University. “The ‘Mason Music & Memory Initiative (M3I)’combines this training with the music intervention and will be implemented in over 100Virginianursing facilities over the next three years.”Source: https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/geriatrics-gerontology-international/music-may-improve-mood-adults-dementialast_img read more

July 18, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 13 2019The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) will launch a new program aimed at boosting student engagement and retention. The Biomedical Engineering Research for Active military and Veterans (BRAVe) program will target undergraduate students, including those at two-year colleges or who haven’t declared majors, and place them in a 10-week summer research lab program to work on projects including: regeneration of damaged tissue, non-invasive tissue recovery, and/or treating soldiers in the battlefield.To make this possible, the federal government awarded a $352,414 National Science Foundation award to UTSA with support from U.S. Congressman Joaquin Castro (TX-20).Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue research”I welcome the National Science Foundation (NSF) funding awarded to the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) to aid in student retention while providing additional resources for undergraduates, active duty military and veterans,” said Rep. Castro. “UTSA remains at the forefront of scientific research while continuing to push community engagement, making them an ideal candidate to receive this grant. San Antonio is home to Military City USA, and UTSA undoubtedly contributes to efforts that improve the lives of students, active duty military and veterans alike.”The program will fund a total of 30 undergraduates over three years. It will also pair participants with faculty members and graduate mentors. At the end of each program cycle, undergraduates will present their research work to the National Biomedical Engineering Society–a once in a lifetime opportunity to showcase work to leaders in the field while making networking connections.BRAVe is lead by Eric Brey, chair of the UTSA Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Amina Qutub, associate professor in the same department.”San Antonio is a city with incredible opportunities for research working on medical challenges vital to the solider or veteran,” said Brey. “This program will expose more people throughout the country to the opportunities at UTSA and in San Antonio, and it’s an opportunity to work with students on important research at a critical time in their educational path.”The program will include collaboration with partners throughout our community, such as the South Texas Veterans Health Care System, the City of San Antonio’s Veterans and Military Affairs Office, Trinity University and the University of the Incarnate Word.UTSA’s military community includes nearly 5,000 veterans, active duty military members, guard, reserves, ROTC members and their spouses and dependents. The university was recently recognized as the No. 6 most Military Friendly School by Victory Media. Source:https://www.utsa.edu/today/2019/03/story/BRAVEeREUgrant.htmllast_img read more